Features Story Archive

UT Austin Satellite Team Stays Positive After Losing Project in Rocket Explosion

race satellite team

This article was updated on Oct. 29, 2014.

After a year and a half of designing, building and testing a small satellite, a team of Cockrell School of Engineering undergraduate and graduate students were set to watch their project head to the International Space Station on Oct. 28 from Wallops Island, Virginia. The satellite was aboard the unmanned Antares rocket, along with other cargo for a resupply mission to the space station.

Just seconds after liftoff, the rocket exploded, destroying the students’ RACE satellite along with various other research projects and experiments. There were no people injured in the explosion. The satellite was a collaborative effort between the school’s Texas Spacecraft Lab and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with the goal of helping scientists measure water vapor in Earth’s atmosphere, which would improve our understanding of the impacts of global weather and climate change.

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Fourteen Impressive Engineers Join the Cockrell School, 2014-15

With research interests in nanomaterials and nanoelectronics, environmental sustainability, biological networks and geomechanics, this year’s incoming faculty members exhibit a wide range of engineering expertise.

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Cockrell School Again Ranked Top 10 by U.S. News & World Report

The Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin is once again ranked in the top 10 in U.S. News & World Report’s 2015 undergraduate program rankings, strengthening the school’s position as one of the nation’s top engineering schools and research destinations.

The Cockrell School retained its 2014 ranking as the No. 10 best engineering school in the country, and several of UT Austin’s engineering programs ranked in the nation’s top 10 for their respective programs, according to the U.S. News & World Report’s annual rankings released on Sept. 9.

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Cockrell School Unveils First-of-its Kind 3-D Printing Vending Machine

3-D printing is rooted in the Cockrell School of Engineering’s past, present and future.

One of the first 3-D printing processes (selective laser sintering), which continues to be used in manufacturing today, was invented here three decades ago. A couple of years ago, Texas Engineering students in the Longhorn Startup Program created a fast and cost-effective 3-D camera and demonstrated it for President Barack Obama. And just last week, the Cockrell School launched a cutting-edge 3-D printing vending machine available for free to all students at The University of Texas at Austin.

The Innovation Station, designed and built by mechanical engineering students led by associate professor Carolyn Seepersad, gives students the opportunity to build objects for a variety of purposes through a web-based portal and queue system.

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University Successfully Completes Campaign, Cockrell School Leads Way

The University of Texas at Austin has successfully completed its Campaign for Texas by raising an estimated $3.1 billion over the past eight years. The Cockrell School of Engineering raised over $350 million, the largest amount raised among the university’s colleges, schools and units during the campaign.

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