The Association for Computing Machinery, the primary professional organization in the field of computer science, has named two University of Texas at Austin professors — Peter Stone and Lizy Kurian John — as ACM Fellows. The award goes only to highly distinguished computer scientists representing the top 1% of ACM members.

Guihua Yu, associate professor of materials science and mechanical engineering in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, is the recipient of the 2021 Edith and Peter O’Donnell Award in Engineering from TAMEST (The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas). He was chosen for his revolutionary use of nanotechnology and conductive polymer-hydrogels to provide solutions to two of society’s biggest challenges: water sustainability and energy storage.

student in lab working on desalination membrane

Producing clean water at a lower cost could be on the horizon after researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and Penn State solved a complex problem that had baffled scientists for decades, until now. Desalination membranes remove salt and other chemicals from water, a process critical to the health of society, cleaning billions of gallons of water for agriculture, energy production and drinking. The idea seems simple — push salty water through and clean water comes out the other side — but it contains complex intricacies that scientists are still trying to understand.

figure of hypersonics vehicle

NASA and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research are backing a team of four universities, led by The University of Texas at Austin, in a project to redefine sensing and analysis of hypersonic vehicles, which can travel at least five times the speed of sound and potentially revolutionize space and air travel.

lizy john and van truskett

Lizy K. John and Van N. Truskett are the latest members of The University of Texas at Austin community to be selected as fellows of the National Academy of Inventors, a prestigious distinction that has been awarded to a select group of 175 academic innovators around the world for 2020.

infographic of super moisture absorbent gels

Technology developed by researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering will help soldiers stationed in some of the driest places on Earth get access to clean drinking water. The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) chose a team led by The University of Texas at Austin to be part of its Atmospheric Water Extraction program. The DARPA program is funding six research teams developing advanced technology to capture potable water as needed from the air and provide enough for soldiers’ daily needs, even in extremely dry areas.

Faster, smaller, smarter and more energy-efficient chips for everything from consumer electronics to big data to brain-inspired computing could soon be on the way after engineers at The University of Texas at Austin created the smallest memory device yet. And in the process, they figured out the physics dynamic that unlocks dense memory storage capabilities for these tiny devices.

Catching deadly diseases like cancer early on is key to improving patient survival odds. However, diseases are much harder to diagnose in their preliminary stages because people often haven't developed symptoms yet and only trace amounts can be found in their bodies.

Cockrell School of Engineering alumna Columbia Mishra has been named the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Foundation’s inaugural Lakshmi Singh Early Career Leadership Award winner. The award, named for a 31-year-old ASME leader who died unexpectedly in 2015, honors a young female engineer who distinguishes herself as a rising volunteer leader within ASME.

In Seattle, “the big one” — a massive earthquake that could devastate the region — represents an ominous threat. So widespread are the concerns that city leaders there created standards to fortify new skyscrapers using data from studies forecasting the impact of a big earthquake in the region.